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than those who don't. multigrain cheerios a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto®
without a "can't lose" attitude. we'll meet a high school [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a st
do they mean and what happens next? joining me now is bob nardelli, former ceo of home depot, former chairman of chrysler, and president of the private equity firm x lr-8. >> thank you. >> as a businessman, what is your take on the fiscal cliff issue? how do you think these negotiations end? >> well, i mean there, is so much speculation out there and such a broad range of opinions. i guess if i had to predict, i would say we probably will not reach agreement and there is a high probability we will go over the cliff, and the impact of that, the repercussions i think are catastrophic. >> that is the thing. we hear this from everybody if we go over the fiscal cliff it will trigger layoffs and trigger the possibility that the economy goes back into recession. in 2013, but the rhetoric again is ratcheting up between house speaker john boehner, senate majority leader harry reid, even though boehner met with the president again this past week, they are stuck on the sacred cows. how do you think it impacts business? from your standpoint what are you hearing from some of your clients and busi
for employees. bob bruno, a labor and employment relations professor at the university of illinois at chicago joins us this morning on set. good morning to you bob. > > good morning. > are unions the answer here? > > i think unions can be the answer. they have been historically. but in these particular cases, something truly creative is going on. these workers are really not demanding a union election vote or a collective bargaining agreement. they are talking about raising standards. they are talking about conditions that are poor and trying to put some pressure on these employers to raise those up. > are the conditions that poor? is the working wage that awful? > > this wage is pretty bad. we are talking about very profitable companies, very profitable industries, in most metropolitan areas; and these workers, on average, will bring in roughly around $22,000, $24,000 a year. and for about half these workers, they are the principal breadwinners. that is about $9-something an hour, without benefits. so it's pretty bad. > > here is a statement coming from rob karr. he is a lobbyist with the il
this, bob pisani and john carney of cnbc. gentlemen, welcome. bob, i get how this is not helpful to workers. you lose the benefits of any dollar cost averaging. you may be ending up getting a lump sum at the end of the year. and if you leave the company before the end of the year, you don't get anything. but what's the real ben fet efi ibm? >> they save on administrative and accounting and they may have even constudies that indicate they'll actually save by make being the lump sum payment because you don't have to put it in certain times of the year and there may be overall cost savings for them. i don't think this is good news for employees at all. it's not just the loss of dollar cost averaging. i think that people may end up putting in less to their account and that's the overall issue. >> i guess savings might accrue from a fact if a worker leaves in july, ibm will have put nothing in for their worker or september or october or whenever. you got to be there into late december to get something so there are some savings there, but beyond that i don't get it. >> i bet what they'
. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. >>> ever since the horrific hurricane sandy rolled through the northeast wrecking everything in its path, i've been telling you that there are two sides to this natural disaster coin. on the one side, of course, most terrible, sandy was an absolutely horrible human tragedy. caused tens of billions of dollars worth of property damage. the flip side is that the superstorm
are trading at $551.33. bob pisani joins me on the floor of the nyse. it started with this idc report citing the fact that they would lose their dominance in the tablet market in probably the next couple of years, and then the margin requirement story. >> it is a little complicated. i just want to address this issue first of the rally that we've got because i think that is sort of what's moving the overall market. there is some vague talk in washington that there may be some republican members starting to break ranks with the leadership on the tax issue. there's talk now that some republicans might be willing to accept higher taxes for the wealthy. this would be a break-through. we're monitoring that. now to what sue was talking about on apple. there are some firms raising margin requirements. i think the main catalyst today was an at&t investor conference where executives of at&t gave sales figures for smartphones for the first two months of the quarter that basically implied sales will be flat for the quarter compared to the same period last year. this includes smartphones, samsung as well
and a hat for 38 bucks. >> add a cup of coffee and a hot dog. >> while we use the word trousers, bob pisani is here watching what's good morning, bob. >> happy monday, everybody. did you notice the market. nice rally here. again, the market is demonstrated that it believes a deal on the fiscal cliff is coming. i know. i didn't hear it over the weekend. headline risk was all anybody wanted to talk about on friday. if anybody says that a deal is not happening or it's going nowhere, we could wake up down 15 points on the s&p on monday. guess what? boehner said the deal is going nowhere. now, when i call the bulls on this, they say, bob, they didn't say a deal was off. they just said so far the negotiations are going nowhere. the market still believes that a deal is coming and it's going to be a substantive deal. instead and by the way, geithner insisted on tax rates issues. looks like there may be something happening eventually. we didn't fall apart on the whole thing. even futures weren't down overnight. instead we rally on a little bit overnight on the greek deal and for those that don't kno
, bob doll will be giving us his lineup for stocks. that's coming up at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive. david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will join us to give us some of his wisdom in a kaerc t can't-miss interview. a lot to talk about with him. in the meantime, why don't we get to some of today's top stories. we could see some movement in the fiscal cliff negotiations. house speaker boehner offering to raise the top tax rates on those making over $1 million a year as well as other measures amounting to $1 trillion in new revenue. that's in exchange for an equal amount in spending cuts. the white house has not yet accepted the proposal. >>> also, apple says it has sold more than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>
with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for y
supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. [ticking] >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. [cheers and applause] >> when steve jobs handpicked walter isaacson to write his life story, he had already been diagnosed with cancer, but after 40 interviews, the biography provides a vivid picture of a complicated man. >> i think it's a tough book. >> it's a book that's fair. i mean, this is a real human being. >> you will hear tape recordings of jobs himself talking about being adopted, creating apple, and his regret over ignoring what could have been life-saving cancer surgery. >> you're born alone, you're gonna die alone, and what exactly is it that you have to lose? there's nothing. [ticking] it's so much more intimate than a laptop. >> when steve jobs unveiled the ipad, there was no way he could have predicted what it would mean to people with autism. it turns out it may be the perfect device to help unlock the isolation many with autism feel by helping them communicate in ways that t
.b.r.," manhasset, new york. >> bob baur is the chief global economist at principle global investors, with $275 billion on management. bob, the higher productive numbers, will that lead to more hiring, regardless of what happens with the fiscal cliff? >> i think it will. we have said for some time that businesses have pushed productivity as far as they can. if we continue at a modest, 2.5% growth rate, that will be enough that businesses wi be fced to higher at a faster pace. >> tom: but we're not hearing a lot of confidence coming from the business community. we're seeing it in housing and automotive sales, but in terms of hiring, it is languishing. why do you think that difference exists? >> i think business is looking ahead. there is a real dichotomy, as you mentioned, between businesses and costumers. businesses are looking ahead, and they're thinking with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already ting action today to try to prepare for that eventuality. but the consumer is kind of blankly ignoring this, a
telling us that this is not a balanced plan. they don't like it yet. and then earlier today, senator bob corker was on cnbc kind of pooh-poohing the whole thing. take a listen. >> we're not close to a deal. and i've been trying for three weeks, i've been standing on my head doing cartwheels to try to pivot toward entitlement reform. this is not a deal here. >> so carl, what's going on right now on capitol hill is that speaker boehner is meeting with his republican conference colleagues behind closed doors. we expect that at the top of the next hour, he's going to come out and talk before cameras. we'll get some reaction from his colleagues as well, what they think of this proposal and where they think this negotiation needs to go. but clearly, negotiations are ongoing, and the president and the speaker are coming closer together, whether or not that makes everybody happy or enough people happy to get a deal still remains to be seen, carl. >> eamon, this is a tough one to read. had the biggest movement been in that -- in the line in the sand with regards to how much people need to make to
? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. bob, these projections... they're... optimistic. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> lately i've been getting a ton of calls about the printing business. no, i'm not talking about old-fashioned printers like the kind you buy from a dinosaur like hewlett-packard. i mean three-dimensional printers. these are machines that can rapidly design and produce functional three-dimensional parts and products. designers use them to whip up prototypes right in their offices instead of having to send out blueprints to an actual manufacturer. increasingly we're seeing them in strange places. dentist's office to make molds and bridges. and now i'm getting a lot of questions. is 3-d printing for real? and if so, what's the best way to play it? because "mad money" is the most interactive show on television i'm going to answer that qu
to buy hain right here. let's go to bob in kansas, please, bob. >> caller: thanks, jim, for taking my call. >> you're quite welcome. >> caller: i have a significant interest in kendall morgan. and in view of the administration's attitude towards oil and gas, should i sell or buy more or hold? >> sir, a lot of people are very worried about the administration's view in oil and gas. i think that rich kendrick's done a remarkable job, i'm sticking by him. i'm not concerned. i think it's a good stock to own. i don't want to buy more, though. let's go to ahmed in california. ahmed. >> caller: what's going on? boo-yah. >> boo-yah to you. >> caller: priceline, is the price right for priceline right now? >> i think it's fine. i think world travel is fine. it's a $600 stock. those have very hard to own. i do prefer expedia to priceline because they also have all that corporate business that's done so well for them. let's go to karen in arizona. karen. >> caller: i'm sorry. a big -- you're the sexiest man, cramer. i'm always in the house whenever i'm watching you. >> thank you. >> caller: my sto
at this point. that's why we have a triple digit advance, up 114 points on the dow jones industrial average. bob pisani with some trading action. the market is aching for a deal. any time we get any sense they are making not even a deal, just they are talking. >> plan b by boehner is a very modest proposal as steve pointed out. the market doesn't care. it's almost as if boehner and obama are in the way and they have to get out of the way. the market deal, even if there isn't a deal, two-month highs on the s&p. look at that, highs of the day, even if you want to be pessimistic, there's not a lot necessarily here that's been going on today. s&p up 14% for the year, folks. we've got a number of new sectors, new highs, financials at new highs, s&p sectors, consumer discretionary group, retailers and home builders also at new highs. look at these home builders, up 4%. an average increase this year. banks and home builders are the two big winners this year. >> kenny, come on in. an independent trader down here at the nyse. mr. geithner in the mix. the administration uses him very effectively to talk t
minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. in this edition, we look at the life of tech titan steve jobs, the cofounder of apple, and we also examine the unexpected impact that one of his inventions, the ipad, is having on children and parents living with autism. in 2004, jobs asked walter isaacson, a former editor of time magazine, if he would write his biography. isaacson thought the request premature since jobs was still a young man. what he didn't know at the time, and only a few people did, was that jobs was about to undergo surgery for pancreatic cancer and was feeling his mortality. in 2009, with jobs already gravely ill, isaacson began the first of more than 40 interviews with him, the last being conducted a few weeks before his death. as steve kroft first reported in october 2011, the result was the best-selling book of the year. >> when walter isaacson first began working on the book-- which is published by simon & schuster, a division of cbs--steve jobs' wife, laurene powell, told him, "be honest with his failings as well as his strengths. there are parts of his life and his p
with you later in the program. >>> for now, we're joined by bob parker on set, senior adviser at credit suisse. bob, welcome. >> thank you. >> what do you make of this? is there any way that this is a positive in terms of perhaps opening the door towards mon at the monte serving in some sort of government? >>. >> i am assuming we're going to have a election probably in the second half of january. we're talking about a position of somewhere between 12 and 17% of the vote. so subsequently, i think fears that berlusconi may come back seem to be misplaced. i think if everyone looks at the last year and a half of what the monte government has achieved in italy, you have to be impressed. we have a strong budget climate surplus. the overall budget has come in dramatically. we've had well fare reform, pension reform. there's further work to be done on the competitiveness of italy. >> i can't tell you how much investors have been talking bullishly about italy. we know it's the eurozone's third biggest economy. obviously what happens in italy is important. they've been saying if anything the prob
price in recession and the prospect of a down grade of u.s. debt once again, back on the table. bob, head of fixed income for vanguard with about three quarters of a trillion dollars under management in money market and bond as sets. bob, i don't know how you sleep at night given the pressure of handling that much money. think about that often. good to see you. >> good to see you. dagen: bob, what do you think of what's happening? washington? what happens in the bond market if recession becomes more likely? >> well, clearly, volatility kicks up a lot, and you're going to see decline in treasury yields and probably a rise in the spread differentials of corporate bonds and other credit backed bonds relative to treasuries so it's not going to be a pretty picture for our bond holder. you know, that said, they are ultimately going to fix this, by they will put us through hell in between. dagen: bob, looking at the -- all the classes of fixed income, the out performance over treasuries in all grades of corporates, even in municipal bonds, but particularly, you start looking at the lower g
boehner has been a good leader during the fiscal cliff negotiations. and then we were joined by bob corker and bob conrad. corker said we need to focus more on entitlements now, and he will not sign any package that doesn't deal with entitlements at this point. conrad said more, not less, should be included in some sort of a big deal. by big deal, he means over $4 trillion. we are now just 20 days away from the fiscal cliff deadline. we continue to bring both sides of the aisle to sit down together. congressman sander levin is a ranking member of the house ways and means committee. and a republican from new jersey, the vice chairman of the house budget committee and a member of the house financial services committee. gentlemen, thank you both for being here. >> thank you. >> we just sat down with senators conrad and corker. they seem to agree on a lot of areas. one of those areas is they think we need to negotiate up from this point, not down from this point and cut some sort of a deal that is 4 trillion or greater when you add up the tax increases. congressman levin, would you agree with
, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ >>> moments like this when everybody is terrifieda our economy coiled slide back into a government induced recession next year, i got to start looking at high quality companies that are immunized against this slow economy. for instance biotech companies that can thrive even during a recession. because that's the typ
year together in clean energy. china and the united states. david: hold on, bob, let me define what you mean about clean energy, a lot of people from nrc did do not include natural gas with clean energy, but do you? >> well, what i'm talking about is wind, solar and other sources, but the key-- >> what about natural gas bob? >> the key to it, david, how we get it. it has to be gotten in a responsible way. we can't continue to put our communities, our ranchers, our farmers at risk and we can't continue to kick down the road the transition we need to make for the sake of our economy, for the sake of our national security for the sake of our-- >> we're not kick it go down the road. this isn't a fiscal cliff kick down the road. they're improving techniques all the time. they're not kicking the problem down the road. >> most are. and those that aren't need to be required to do so. we need to improve the public oversight. right now they don't have to comply with our foundational safeguards, david. like the clean water act. safe drinking water. that needs to be changed so that all of these com
bob moffett t chairman of both companies, mmr, owns a stake in pxp, board seats. it's related. >> and yet, ackerson, did we get hold of him? he's always been very pro shareholder. this is the most anti-shareholder. unless you're a very large shareholder. >> isn't he cynical? >> these guys are different, moffett and our man in chesapeake. >> thank you. they approach the world a little different. >> is it different from you? you're fitzgerald. >> i don't want to say cavalier, but they like to take risks, that's how they built their fortune in the first police, they all take risks. >> i thought if you bought freeport, you were trying to play the grassberg, big copper, the china thing, i didn't know i was getting involved in a high stakes poker match. >> yes. which is why you're selling. >> let's get to bob pisani who's on the floor watch what's moving. >> moffett wants the cash flow from freeport who helped finance the drilling for mcmoran drilling. why did they have to spend 70% premium to buy these things? if i wanted to buy them, i could have bought them a lot cheaper, i wante
. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. >>> you know it is going to be interesting when snoop city on the floor. time for the mad dash. talk con-agra, stock close to 13-year highs lately. >> jerry rod kin an amazing ceo, one of the best consumer -- one of the best consumer packaged goods men i have he ever seen. moving aggressively a private leve
about half a percent. bob joins me on the floor of the nyse. the market is very undecided about what is happening in washington. what the feds know that perhaps we don't know. >> we are getting smacked around by these two separate events. the fiscal cliff as well as aftermath of what went on with the fed. i think the fed is still very important here. take a look the dow industrials. remember, we started moving down right after we saw mr. bernanke give his press conference. we talked about fiscal cliff having problems, not having the tools to deal with the fiscal cliff. the fed not having it, should we go over that. there we are dealing with the aftermath. remember something folks, september 14 is the high for the s&p this year. you know why that is important in september 13 is the fed meeting. they bought into the fed meeting and sold right after that, sue. and they are doing that again today. we are repeating what happened just a few months ago. i think that's why it is very important. elsewhere, defense stocks. here is a group that's very worried about frustration when mr. bernanke
and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the economy to grow a bit. >> susie: what if there isn't a deal? does that mean there is going to be a sell-off or a correction in the markets? >> i think the hype in the recent days that a deal is coming is certainly responsible for the rally. i think if there is no deal, and the probabilities of that have gone down, thankfully, but if there is no deal, i still think we're not going to go off some nasty cliff that peop
. we are at the gi bill rates the guys came back from the war. >> bob pisani is here this morning more on what's moving. hey, bob? >> let you know about an ipo pricing down here, pbf energy here operation 20.5 million shares at 26. this looks ready to open at 28. the book is frozen right now so that means that the -- the specialist you can the dmm here has indicated the final price is in, it looks like pbf is going to open right now at $28, one of two ipos down that are priced today, solarcity pricing over on the nasdaq that is not yet open. get to more on that shortly. guys, mentioning when will the bond bubble burr president? big topic overnight that i was getting, at least. the feds actually yesterday, yields spiking up, reignited this debate. remember, this was the big call at this time last year, 2012, the year the bond bubble burst. by the way, it hasn't abated. it has continued into the fourth quarter of this year, despite other people's predictions. seen continue outflows in stock mutual funds, the call for 2012 the wrong call, reignited, you mentioned ray dal yo, dave rubenste
? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> welcome back. we're talking with maya macguiness. let me get your take on this final question. number one, two-part question. do we need to cut medicare in terms of really getting our arms around the debt of this country? number two, if we don't get our arms around the debt and lower the debt and deficits of the u.s., what are the implications for our kids? what are the implications for the economy? give it to us straight. >> there's no question that the most important challenge for us to tackle here is controlling health care costs. medicare is at the center of it when it comes to the budget. we're going to have to do as much as possible to get on top of the fact
after yesterday's big selloff. i want to get to bob here with a look at the big moves before we take a break. over to you, bob. >> we hit the one-month high on the dow, maria, led by some of the tech stocks like ibm and intel. apple was the big story. we ended positive, but just barely. apple, $50 lost in the last two days. today, huge volume. 40 million shares. that's twice normal. company telling nbc, brian williams, they'll start building some mac computer lines here in the united states. big interview on that tonight. let's take a look at some of the computer hardware stocks. nice turn around. remember that disaster with dell and hewlett a few weeks ago? they've been moving up in the last several days. look at this move and this turn around. apple to the downside. all the others in the month of december to the up side. how about the airlines? new high for the airline index. jet fuel costs are low. capacity is constrained. i'm hearing booking is returning to normal after sandy, after a hit for them. those stocks up. u.s. airways up. southwest has been on fire recently. finally, th
] to learn more about the cold truth well, if itmr. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> and we are back. twitter is erupting tonight over breaking news out of michigan where republicans in the state have passed a right to work law. kevin tweets, "michigan must be crazy. right to work legislation quickly brings lower wages. aren't they suffering enough?" and ellen vollbrecht says "the name right to work is one of the biggest cons. it's not right to work. it's the right to be fired for any reason whether right or wrong." keep sharing your thoughts with us on facebook and on twitter using #edshow. >>> coming up, apple ceo tim cook announces plans to produce some of their computers right here i
of pento portfolios, no idea where you are, and bob pisani on the floor of the new york stock exchange. what did you make, stephanie, of today's market action? you're the trader and follow the short-term swings. what was the message of the market do you think today? >> the message is the market is nothing is really going to change. interest rates will be low for an extended period of time. the fact that they tied the rates to unemployment, a little bit of a twist to the story, but it means that rates stay low. i think that the housing theme continues. i think that financials continue to work because even though you have a flat yield curve they are a beneficiary of the housing cycle, and away from all of this you focus on what happens internationally and china continues to recover. europe looks like it's stabilizing and we didn't change our strategy based on the news, just a little bit more of what you're doing. >> randy, anything change for you? >> no, not really. what we're watching is the parallels that occur now, where we stood with the fiscal cliff and where we stood in 1999 with t
over the past few days alone. our bob pisani joins me here on the floor of the nyse. what are you hearing from traders? the market is drifting a little bit. the focus is on apple. there seems to be a little bit of enthusiasm that it can come back to the up side. >> we were up a little while ago, now we're down. i think what happened, the senate majority leader harry reid came out with a couple of comments. he said any program, any deal that's out there must include a stimulus component -- really? a stimulus component? he said rates have to increase to 39.6% as part of any deal. the dow drifted lower on that because people were arguing you should have a 37% as a compromise on the tax rates. >> mr. geithner yesterday when speaking exclusively to steve leisman seemed to really avoid that 39% number. that encouraged a lot of people thinking that perhaps that is a flexible number. >> let's hope it is. but the senate majority leader says -- specifically said 39.6. i think that's specifically the reason we took a little bit of a dive a while ago. either side are positive or negative. but
boehner doesn't seem to have the power and grover does. >> the point, again, bob corker's pledge is not to me, it is to the voters of tennessee, that's the argument he's made again and again. if he wants to have a different conversation with the voters, that's his choice. >> why is corker the coolest man on earth? who does he play golf with? peyton manning. >> really? >> he's giving me all the big -- the minimum tax. i said, what are you up to this weekend? he said, i played golf with peyton manning. i said, are you kidding me? that seems to be more important to you than the fiscal cliff. >> 11-3? >> they still need home field advantage. >> they're competing for a first round play-off. what peyton has done is just amazing. steve liesman's exclusive with lacquer. one more look at futures this morning. we'll cover what 10% on squawk earlier today. and a lot more when "squawk on the street" comes right back. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 l
bob corker on a little later this morning, too. and we can talk to him about that. he's a big defender of gun rights, particularly in his state of tennessee. >> we did show you the futures. they are indicated higher. you can see right now the dow futures up by 6 points. the nasdaq is up by just about 13 points. we've been watching oil prices this morning, as well. oil prices are up about 50 cents. you take a look at the ten-year, the ten-year note is yielding 7 of 68%. and the dollar this morning is down across the board. euro is trading at 1 is 31.79. the dollar/yen is at 83.86. gold prices have barely budged. they're up about 1.80 to $1700 an ounce. >> maybe kelly knows, that euro, is that a six-month high? >> well, yeah. >> you guys have to keep up. you're not keeping up. you guys have to print. let's go here. >> one of the aggressions after japanese elections, now the bank of japan is under huge pressure to bring more quantitative easing and much more stimulus. one big question is are we going to see the eurozone rs theed to copy that and we're going to see 2013 with quantitative e
, bob. we did. got it. >>> if you notice unusual trades happening today, it might be because of those gentlemen. >> and ladies. >> they'll ring the opening bell. >> we'll tell you more about that in a couple of minutes. in the meantime -- >> they are gentlemen. >> in the meantime, the president is in hawaii on vacation. washington lawmakers are on holiday. there's still no deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. the deadline is a week away. hampton pearson is in washington on the stalemate. >> as early as the day after christmas, congress and the white house will have to start to deal with what president obama called the real consequences of going over that fiscal cliff. >> nobody can get 100% of what they want. and this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who doesn't. there are real world consequences to what we do here. >> a short-term deal won't just focus on tax rates. the end of the payroll tax cut and the impact of the hike in the minimum tax on january 1st. over the weekend, we did hear from some republican moderates who say it may in fact be time to
bob mcdonnell says some of the cuts to state agencies recommended to him will appear in his budget even if congress and the white house reach a deal to avert the fiscal cliff. >>> a developing story out of north korea. the country may set off a long range rocket as early as this monday. that's according to media reports in south korea. the rocket is reportedly being fueled, but heavy snowfall may have slowed down preparations. north korea wants to launch what it calls a peaceful satellite sometimes before november 22nd. the u.s. believes the rocket is a cover to test missile technology. >>> president obama is speaking out against ongoing unrest in egypt. he has called egyptian president mohamed morsi to express concern about recent protests that have resulted in numerous deaths and injuries, calling the violence unacceptable. president obama did welcome morsi's call for talks with opposition leaders. this comes after a violent week in cairo. on wednesday night, six were killed and nearly 700 injured in protest outside morsi's palace. >>> this morning d.c. mayor vincent gray will an
brownstein is cnn's senior political analyst, editorial director at the national journal, bob shrum is with us, democratic strategist will cane is a cnn contributor and columnist for the blaze.com. let's talk a little bit about fiscal cliff. depending on who you believe, it's going fine, or it's going terribly and we're never, ever going to have any kind of agreement, we're going to go right over the cliff, especially now that the republicans have but up their counterproposal, what do you think? or is it kabuki theater? >> i think it's kabuki theater. i think the republican proposal is a serious proposal. it's not where the deal is going to end. there has been an election. but it does reprise a lot of the arguments from the negotiations between the president and john boehner in the summer of 2011. it's not something that really should be laughed off the page. i mean, the most difficult thing for republicans is accepting an increase in the top rate for the top earners in the tax rate which they don't want to do in this proposal but which they don't ever have to vote for in order to h
in an hour for the closing bell. thanks so much. >> thanks, bob. speaking of the market shortened session one more hour. let's head over to maria at post 9. >> thanks, carl. hi everybody. welcome to the closing bell. i'm maria bartiroma at the new york stock exchange. no, your watch is not wrong. the closing bell ringing three hours early today at 1:00 eastern for christmas eve. hi, bill. >> hey, maria. i'm bill griffith here at cnbc world headquarters. a down day not terrible, light volume as you might imagine on this half day. the dow down about 40 points right now. 46-point decline at 13,144. all the other major averages lower as well. the nasdaq at this hour down about ten points at 3,011 and the s&p 500 down 4.25. >> certainly volume on the light side today. though we're facing light volume there is still money to be made in these markets. remember after the closing bell rings in less than an hour there are only four trading days left in 2012. amazing. >> we know what happens after that right? >> let me ask you bill. i know you've always thought a deal would happen in the 11th hour. seri
. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. we have a big big hour and the iq will go way up. [ music ] >> this is the "full-court press," "the bill press show," live on your radio and current tv >> bill: alan saint pierre from norml is going to come on to talk about what happens now incomed and washington state other than a lot of people lighting up. what are the feds going to do? what are the states going to do? we will get to that in the next hour. heading toward here we are, december 7th, rounding out 2012 and, you know, at this time of year, everybody does lists. this is the list season. right? yahoo has started it by looking back the some of the finds yahoo has found what people were searching for obsessed by. the web life editor, heather cabot. >> thank you for having me. >> what are americans into this year? overall, when people came to yahoo as a search engine what were they looking for? >> i think you will be pleas antsly surprised -- pleas antsly surprised. this is the third time we have been putting together these lists, the top search was a n
in a competitive way. what does bob greifeld do at nasdaq? bob greifeld, basically team that to take over the stock exchange, a deal that was shot down by u.s. securities regulators. what does bob greifeld do? he is up against a formidable player in the stock exchange, new york specializes in stocks, trading equities. these guys specializing in commodities. they have to do something competitively. why did duncan neiderauer sellout? we have a chart and we will show you. it talks about volume. if you look at the amount of trading volume, we have that charge. >> best laid plans. lori: that is double of new york stock exchange, euronext, is that what you're getting at? no. >> what i'm getting at should be on a chart right now, is volume. this is like a amazing. this is coming. move on. there we go. that tells you the story of why duncan niederauer had to sell. look how trading volume shoots up. and it has been coming down ever since. that is bad, bad things. that means if, that means that, revenues, at the new york stock exchange are in a secular decline. that is bad. that means you have to sell. melis
, he was horrible in debates. >> no, you had to hold your breath all the time. >> and then bob dole, you had to hold your breath. and george w., good old guy, but that guy had trouble with the english language. >> you're going up against bubba. the best on the planet. >> it would be nice to have somebody -- >> no, that's why it was so sad when people like mitch daniels and haley didn't go in this time because they sound like churchill compared. >> guess who i just got an e-mail from? alexandra liebenthal. how exciting. julia, stay with us. >> jean just e-mailed me. >> you're a bad man. i mean, you really are. >> bad to the bone. >> we should do a segment. >> yeah. >> like the conversation we had at the dinner table. and you all have to listen. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. you wrote this past month. did you make your deadline? >> you know, again -- >> david. >> we love david. >> we love david. >> the magazine's awesome. it came with an ax. >> oh. >> i bought it for my mom for christmas. >> that was sweet. >> she'll use it. >> chop up. >> you have no idea. >> actionabl
interesting conversations over the weekend was bob corker saying, let's just go ahead, concede to the tax argument, which would flip the entire spotlight onto entitlements, which is what republicans have been trying to get the discussion to be about over the last couple of weeks. >> when you hear about entitlements, why aren't they talking directly, you know, medicare part b koshcosts x, or medicare a, should cost this. the last thing a republican wants to do is say, look, i'm cutting back medicare. so, i mean, if you switch it to entitlements, suddenly everyone has to say, social security goes from 66 to 68. is that what we do? do we means test medicare? it is so much easier for grover who will be on cnbc, forget the fiscal cliff, i will come after you with both barrels. if you vote tax increase. what's more -- do they want to rise above a tax increase? no. do they want to rise above fiscal cliff? no. what they want it do is not rise above the radar screen of raising taxes. and grover is more powerful than a recession. i asked him point-blank on "meet the press," college chum, look, it d
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